Patrick Castle has a talent for developing inventive solutions to complicated legal problems. He has represented clients in multiple forums, including state and federal courts and domestic and international arbitrations, and has experience across all stages of litigation, including trial. Patrick achieves successful outcomes through creative legal analysis, clear writing, and persuasive argument.

During his time at the University of Chicago Law School, Patrick was on the Hinton Moot Court board and was awarded the Thomas R. Mulroy Prize for Excellence in Appellate Advocacy. Before law school, Patrick was a Teach For America corps member, teaching high school special education and civics in St. Louis, Missouri.

Representative Experience

  • Second-chaired an international arbitration that resulted in total victory and a multi-million dollar arbitration award for the firm’s client. Patrick conducted direct examination of a key witness and delivered closing argument on the opposing parties’ more than 20 counterclaims, all of which were denied.
  • Successfully briefed and argued motion for judgment on the pleadings that achieved total victory for the firm’s client before any discovery responses were exchanged. The Court’s judgment included dismissal with prejudice of all counterclaims.
  • Successfully argued motion to dismiss that resulted in dismissal with prejudice of claims that had been filed against the founders and executive officers of the firm’s corporate client, who were sued as individuals in the midst of bet-the-company litigation between the client and its opponent, a multi-million dollar international corporation.
  • Successfully argued multiple discovery disputes, including regarding e-discovery issues.
  • Represented the U.S. subsidiary of a Fortune Global 100 company in a high-stakes domestic arbitration.
  • Represented former directors and officers of a national media company against claims of breach of fiduciary duty and fraudulent transfer in an ongoing multi-district litigation.
  • Represented bondholder in a $50 million dispute over bonds issued by a Native American tribe.

Presentations

Private Practice: Are communications sent from employees to their attorneys using employer-owned technology privileged? (2014)