Emily devotes the majority of her time to handling product liability matters for a Fortune 500 company. These matters are in jurisdictions throughout the country and provide Emily with the opportunity to practice in different settings and under many different local rules and customs.

Emily oversees a docket of approximately 40 to 50 cases and has extensive experience in all phases of litigation. Her practice is demanding and fast-paced and includes claims for wrongful death, personal injury and property damage. She has successfully mediated, arbitrated and tried cases ranging in value from the nominal to the multi-million. She routinely argues every type of motion, handles or supervises all phases of fact and expert discovery, and works hand-in-hand with clients to formulate strategic case solutions.

Emily’s work for her clients is one of partnership. She takes pride in her product knowledge and in understanding the needs and goals of her clients. Through this partnership approach, Emily is not only effective at litigating cases but is also a useful resource in helping her clients achieve their business needs. Spending most of her time working for a client who uses an alternative billing arrangement as opposed to the typical billable hour, Emily’s work and handling of matters is practical, efficient and tactical. She is a responsive and committed litigator.

Before joining Shook, Emily was a litigation associate at firms in New York City and Wisconsin, where she quickly gained practical experience balancing a significant number of civil defense matters. Her work focused on medical malpractice, municipal and constitutional claims, premises liability and commercial litigation.

Representative Matters

Emily and her litigation teams work to obtain favorable results for her clients at every stage of litigation.

Voluntary Dismissals. Emily’s product knowledge allows her to evaluate the strength of a case from a very early stage and to leverage case facts to negotiate voluntary dismissals for her clients. Some representative dismissals include:

  • the manufacturer of a respiratory protection device that was worn by a firefighter who died during a training exercise in Pennsylvania;
  • the manufacturer of a fire suppression device that activated and resulted in water damage to a warehouse storing millions of dollars of pharmaceuticals in Kentucky;
  • the manufacturer of a respiratory protection device that was worn by a firefighter during an industrial fire in Texas; and
  • the manufacturer of a fire suppression device that purportedly caused damage to a large condominium property in New Jersey.

Summary Judgments. Emily has successfully resolved cases at the summary judgment stage, saving her clients the costs of a trial. She has obtained summary judgment for:

  • a fire suppression device manufacturer in a $900,000 lawsuit involving significant property damages to a Texas warehouse facility;
  • a fire suppression device manufacturer in a $600,000 lawsuit involving extensive water damage to a Texas restaurant; and
  • a fire suppression device manufacturer in a lawsuit involving water damage to a church in Minnesota.

Favorable Settlements. Emily negotiates settlements when necessary, and she has obtained favorable settlements for her clients. In one case, she negotiated a zero-pay contribution for the manufacturer of a respiratory protection device that was worn by a contractor who died during a petroleum clean-up.

Trials. Emily has served on a number of trial teams. In one case, her team obtained a defense verdict for the manufacturer of a fire suppression device and defeated product liability claims suggesting the device was defective by showing that the product was misused.

Publications

Sandy Stigall, Emily Sullivan, and Kristi Burmeister, Perspectives from Three Female Litigators, Fire Protection Contractor, Dec. 2014, at 20.

Emily Sullivan & Sarah Baltzell, Be an Effective Expert Witness, Fire Protection Contractor, October 2014.

Jack Laffey and Emily Sullivan (Olson), Wisconsin: Spoliation of Evidence, DRI: Spoliation of Evidence: A Compendium of State and Federal Law, 2006.